Saturday, August 29, 2015

- Rust happens

Don just finished another assemblage in the Porch Series ... 


Then we went in search of new/old stuff at a neighborhood moving sale, which yielded some wonderful rust ...


and better yet, my copy of Alice Fox's new book arrived ...


After a first pass, I have no doubt that both Don and I will find much of value to use in our own creative endeavors ... not to mention the pleasure of seeing the wide range of works beautifully captured in its pages.

10 comments:

ARTISUN said...

I love Alice Fox's new book, simply stunning!

Liz Ackert said...

I have to admit, it's rare for me to read a book like this word for word ... this is the exception that proves the rule

Mo Crow said...

re Alice's new book... it's not just more of the same mixed media/rust/eco-dyeing that has been happening online for most of this century?

Liz Ackert said...

Hard for me to say ... I'm still so new to all this. I'd have to say that I didn't learn much that I didn't already know, but I was delighted at how it pulled together so many of the things that have appealed to me in learning about slow cloth over the past year. And the photographic examples are a delight.

Mo Crow said...

ah that's good news, I have a copy of "Tide Marks", a poetic book made to accompany her exhibition of the same name in 2013

Liz Ackert said...

Oh lucky you ... the pictures of Tide Marks in the new book are amazing

Dana said...

Its great when a book touches your own creative spirit and sends you forward. This sounds like one worth investigating. Don's assemblage is very satisfying.

Liz Ackert said...

And I love how much more sense a book like this makes to me now compared to just a year ago. I have every hope that Claire Wellesley-Smith's new book will be equally enjoyable.

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

love the "combs"

Liz Ackert said...

Not at all sure what they were used for ... the guy who sold them to me said he thought they were dividers of some kind. There are four widths from 1-4 inches with equally spaced flat tines, but they are bent so that I can't see how useful they'd be. Plus, the divisions are strange ... the 1" pieces are divided into sixths and ninths for instance. Go figure.