Monday, December 7, 2015

- Freestyling an Inktense palette

I've said it more times than I can count, but I've never met a recipe that I followed exactly. So why change now?

Sharon Tomlinson is doing a wonderful free online class over on her blog The Cloth Side of Me and today's video was about creating an Inktense color library since the color at the end of each pencil is not a reliable guide.

For better or worse, I actually have a 48 color set of Inktense pencils, which is why I gulped realizing how challenging it was going to be to keep track of them all. So I changed Sharon's suggested technique a bit by making a square of each color on wet linen ...


then brushed the colors out with a damp paintbrush, touched them up with a bit more pencil, ironed them dry, and cut them into thin strips ...


After that, I attached them to the pencils with Matte Mod Podge, twisting some of the strips around as I belatedly realized that it would be helpful to have the most intense color visible over the name on each pencil ...


I'm halfway through and cautiously optimistic this will do the trick ...

8 comments:

Dana said...

What a good idea! I'm looking forward to seeing these colors in action.

Liz Ackert said...

It was fiddly fun

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

Good Grief!!!! and WOW!

Liz Ackert said...

Ha! Showing my obsessive side ... not sure if that's a good thing or not.

handstories said...

Clever!

Liz Ackert said...

Learn by playing ... Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (recommended by Deb Sposa) + Maura Ambrose's natural dyeing workshop + Sharon Tomlinson's Inktense videos = 1 sweet Christmas gift, with more to follow (pix after the holidays)

ARTISUN said...

What a great idea. I've not heard of these pencils, are they for fabric or paper or both?

Liz Ackert said...

I'm probably not the best person to answer this since I don't have a lot of art supply experience, but these pencils can be used on paper or fabric, have the potential for laying down saturated color, and supposedly don't run after they dry so you can layer one color over another (ironing is recommended to set color on fabric).