Monday, February 22, 2016

- Unearthed

They say rocks don't rise up out of the soil. Rather, the soil is washed away, thereby exposing the rocks ... un-earthing them.

Patch #53: Rust-dyed linen

The story behind today's patch is actually two stories. It began when Don found an unusual rock on the floodplain, surely a fossil.

"Look it up," I suggested. And so he did, finding first an image ...

Fossil a-side

and then a description ...

Fossil b-side

that both seemed to fit what he had in hand. Pleurotomaria glenrosensis most likely, since the Glen Rose formation outcrops in our area. And the Lower Cretaceous dating also fits with our location in Hays County ...


How old does that make it? 100-145 million years old. Definitely worthy of a commemorative patch ... but how?

I started pawing through piles of cloth (no other word for my search methodology), which yielded some potentially interesting dye experiments on muslin. Still, they weren't exactly what I had in mind, so I headed back to look some more. And there on the floor, I spotted a small scrap of rusted cloth that had worked its way loose from the overlying cloth strata. I recognized it as a one-time contender for a compass rose on Triangulation ...


but fortunately, it didn't make the cut for that project. Because really, when turned to the back it became the perfect solution ...

Wouldn't you say?

17 comments:

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

yes, i Would say....how beautyFull to Find the ancient one in the first
place, then how perfect the cloth scrap to hold it

Liz Ackert said...

Serendipity is a wonderful thing

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

it is. like a kiss on the forehead from the god thing

Simone de Klerk said...

Amazing find and beautifully patched!

Liz Ackert said...

I do like kisses on the forehead ... gentle blessings

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks muchly ... I was tempted to add stitch (and may yet), but for now I'm enjoying the indefinite bands of rust.

Roxanne said...

It's quite common for me to adapt cloth and thread formations that happen accidentally into stitching patterns.
I love when that happens. I'm also impressed with the fossils Texas offers the observant ones. I have a paltry, but much treasured collection.

Mo Crow said...

magic! but I refute who ever "they" are, over a couple of years I built rock walls out of the rocks that surfaced in a garden I made where 2 creeks met

Susan McQuade said...

Wow! What a find on both accounts. How awesome. Bless you!

Liz Ackert said...

Our collection is pretty thin, too. I'll have to do a post about the first fossil I found the day we first looked at the house. When it was still there the next day, I took it as a sign that we were meant to have it (the fossil and the house, actually). But since then, I've found it hard to spot fossils, although I sense there are many in plain sight.

Liz Ackert said...

I know what you mean ... it seems like the earth births rocks to me. And of course, there are our epic floods to wash them out of their rocky homes.

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks Susan ... this was a fun post from start to finish

Mo Crow said...

my friend Pete guru of shamanic permaculture, built a garden on a 13 acre ridge in Brazil that formed a dragon spine & birthed quartz crystals

Liz Ackert said...

I'd love to see that ... is there an online link anywhere??

Mo Crow said...

Pete has built a new garden & life with Bel Cesar at Vida de Clara Luz
http://www.vidadeclaraluz.com.br/
Google Translate helps translate the Portuguese to English

Mo Crow said...

here's some photos of the magic valley where Pete lived for 14 years
http://lougold.blogspot.com.au/2007/10/magical-matutu-matutu-valley-of.html

Liz Ackert said...

These pictures are other-worldly ... what an amazing place!