Thursday, July 14, 2016

- Learning as I go (it's all about process)

Retrospective (7/20/2016) 

Patch #196 A patch of blue sky



An early piece of embroidery from the 1960s, when I was on the first of many learning curves.

Original Post

Georgia's Window is coming together slowly, but surely ...


The sash bars of the window surrounding each pane proved to be the biggest challenge, requiring front seams to be sewn on both sides of a very narrow strip of maroon linen ...


created by overcast stitching each seam (14-18 stitches per inch) with the front sides facing out ...


After which the inside edges are trimmed ...


leaving the lower-most edge twice the width of the other three interior edges ...


Finger-pressing the top two interior edges downward first ...


the wider of the lower interior edges is then folded over the narrower edge ...


so the sandwiched lower edges can be folded over the top edges ...


pinned in place ...


and stitched over the upper edges (which I believe to be akin to French or felled seaming) ...


All that so that the front can continue to look exactly the same as it did before ..


while the back goes from looking like this ...



to a much tidier finish ....


This reimagining of Georgia O'Keeffe's painting Door through Window (1956) was influenced by looking at pictures and videos about Pojagi, a form of two-sided quilting used to make wrapping cloths in Korea. Any wonkiness introduced by my idiosyncratic methodology leads me to categorize this as "Pojagi-influenced" in my blog index (with an additional entry for "Bojagi" as there are those who use an alternate spelling).

10 comments:

jude said...

my very first patchwork was pojagi. a curtain for my bedroom. I have no idea what happened to it. I was 12. I think Mom probably gave it to the church thrift shop. It faded and she thought it looked awful. Ha.
It takes patience but you have that.

Dana said...

Pojagi is great for curtains because it looks so pretty with the light shining through it. Georgia's Window fits with that idea too. Thanks for showing the seaming. There is something so satisfying about finishing the edges like that.

Dee Mallon said...

love the colors. how pretty they'll be with light coming from behind. and felled seams? well, I'm not surprised, how you handle a needle!

Mo Crow said...

beautiful!

Liz Ackert said...

I think I was doing crewel embroidery kits when I was 12 ... I may be late to the quilting game, but the skills I learned way back when (and yes, patience) are serving me well.

Thanks for coming by

Liz Ackert said...

Of course, as soon as I posted this I modified my technique. Still learning ...

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks Dee ... as much as I admire your stitching, I really appreciate this

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks Mo ... these are the edges I most love to caress these days

ARTISUN said...

You my friend are a very brave woman to take this on! Incredible needlework as always xoxo

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks, as always, for the encouragement. The technique really suits my modus operandi, so it will probably show up again ... I just wish I had come upon it sooner