Wednesday, October 14, 2015

- Hill Country colors

This is a box of rocks ... part of my morning exercise, which consisted of hauling them from the floodplain to a front garden bed. But it's the piece of cloth in the middle that has me really excited ...

Limestone (white and grey rock) and oxidized chert cobbles

along with the other pieces on the drying rack below ...


which were all dyed with Prairie Tea, which came back after a 5" rain last month ...

Notice the grass below has dried out after 4 weeks with no rain


While I was hoping for a yellow like my original Prairie Tea dyeing, I was delighted to find that results this time around reminded me of the colors on the floodplain ...




Not to mention the critters that hang out there ...


Moth(?) feeding on Snow-on-the-Mountain

The closer I looked at the marks left behind, the happier I got ...



And how about this? I bundled up all my loose patches and pinned them into a piece of yellow linen shirting, then hung the Prairie Tea-soaked bundle up to dry, resulting in some strong rust-colored marks ...


Who knows where this may lead ...

West Trail to the floodplain ... purposefully winding to minimize flood damage

6 comments:

Dana said...

Your cloth will speak of the place it was made...terroir! I love the various textures in your patches.

Roxanne said...

Those golds are some of my favorites for using in work. I do love how color migrates as it dries. It's all so random.

Liz Ackert said...

The perfect word: terroir!

Liz Ackert said...

I think the colors are a large part of why I love our home in the Hill Country ... they also make me think of Andrew Wyeth's palette (even though he was the antithesis of random)

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

i SWOOOON....am going to look up prairie tea....see if we have it here

Liz Ackert said...

Prairie Tea (aka Croton) is listed in the Edible and Useful Plants of the Southwest by Delena Tull ... which includes New Mexico. Here's hoping you find some in your neck of the "woods"