Friday, February 26, 2016

- Deep knowing

Feel something in your bones, know what to look for ...

Patch #57: indigo-dyed linen from a vintage table cloth

know what to listen for ...


then shield your eyes as you look into the sun and blindly point the camera at the sky ...


because, yes ... the sandhill cranes are headed north again.


11 comments:

grace Forrest~Maestas said...

this might be my favorite ever...and yes. They are Gathering here. Practicing
flight maneuvers, strengthening their wings, their sense of one another. Such beauty in this to me, such Love of How It Is on this Planet....
Thank You for this Knowing and for this patch.

Simone de Klerk said...

Liz, this is amazing, how you have put this flock motion into stationary. I am always overwhelmed, spellbound and fascinated, hearing and seeing a flock flying over.
Happy weekend!

Liz Ackert said...

Don and I were walking the property and I said, "I wonder when we'll see the sandhills?" ... not five minutes later Don said, "I hear them." Made me realize how much the rhythms of this place have become a part of who I am.

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks much ... I'll be looking up this afternoon (the flocks often pause for a few minutes to kettle in the updrafts over the floodplain, giving them a breather before continuing on)

Liz Ackert said...

Here's a link to more about kettling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kettle_%28birds%29

Dana said...

I thought the fossil patch was brilliant and now this...the fluid movement of air and wing contrasts vividly with the age-long calcification of the pre-historic snail, yet both are singing of the energy of the earth.

jude said...

i like this

Liz Ackert said...

The world gives us so much to see, if only we take the time to look.

Liz Ackert said...

Thanks ... me, too

Simone de Klerk said...

Interesting! Never knew this. Did you see them kettle?

Liz Ackert said...

Not this time, but we have seen the sandhill cranes do this in the past. We also see Hawks and buzzards using the thermals all year round ... the difference is in how many more cranes there are in the migrating flocks.